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Stauranderaster coronatus (Forbes)

 

Members of the genus Stauranderaster possess a swollen, well-armoured central disc and elongate arms.  The various species can be recognised by the enlarged primary interadials (which define the crown of the central disc) and the centro-dorsal (which sits at the centre of the disc); for Stauranderaster coronatus these are conical, with a flared and notched base, and often a flattened apex.  Though well preserved are very scarce,  S. coronatus is the most common Grey Chalk Stauranderaster

 

1).  Aboral view of a large and unique specimen, exhibiting near perfect articulation of the slender arms (x1.2, Grey Chalk, Burham, Kent, Smith Collection, BMNH (British Museum (Natural History) London) E2562).  Image 2005 The Natural History Museum, by kind permission.

 

2).  Aboral view of the partial type specimen; the enlarged primary interadials form a distinctive ring around the central disc (x1.4, Grey Chalk, Washington, Sussex, Dixon Collection, BMNH (British Museum (Natural History) London) 35480).  Image 2005 The Natural History Museum, by kind permission.

 

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3).  Primary interadials; (A) Detail of the type specimen (Fig. 2) showing the distinctive primary interadials; (B) ventral (top) view of an isolated primary interradial of Stauranderatser cf. coronatus, and and (C) lateral (side) view showing the low-cone profile (x7.0, Grey Chalk, Lulworth Cove, Dorset, Randell Collection, RR1247.  Image (A) 2005 The Natural History Museum, by kind permission.

    

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4).  Detail of the specimen in Fig. 1; (A) Ventral and (B) lateral views of an exceptionally well preserved arm (x2.8).  Images 2005 The Natural History Museum, by kind permission.